aims and scope

The algebraic approach to system specification encompasses many aspects of the formal design of software systems. Originally born as a formal method for reasoning about abstract data types, it now covers new specification frameworks and programming paradigms (such as object-oriented, aspect-oriented, agent-oriented, logic and higher-order functional programming) as well as a wide range of application areas (including information systems, concurrent, distributed and mobile systems). The workshop will provide an opportunity to present recent and ongoing work, to meet colleagues, and to discuss new ideas and future trends.

Typical, but not exclusive topics of interest are:

  • Foundations of algebraic specification
  • Other approaches to formal specification, including process calculi and models of concurrent, distributed, and cyber-physical systems
  • Specification languages, methods, and environments
  • Semantics of conceptual modelling methods and techniques
  • Model-driven development
  • Graph transformations, term rewriting, and proof systems
  • Integration of formal specification techniques
  • Formal testing and quality assurance, validation, and verification
  • Algebraic approaches to cognitive sciences, including computational creativity

The workshop takes place under the auspices of IFIP WG 1.3.

5 previous WADT workshops

Leverhulme School on Graph Transformation Techniques

This occurrence of the ADT workshop will be preceded by the Leverhulme School on Graph Transformation Techniques. The school will take place over three days, from Friday, June 29th, to Sunday, July 1st.

important dates

submission dates
27th April 2018 Extended 18th May 2018
Abstract submission deadline
18th May 2018 Extended 25th May 2018
Notification of acceptance
1st June 2018 Extended 8th June 2018
Final abstract due
registration and workshop dates
8th June 2018 15th June 2018
Late registration deadline
2nd to 5th July 2018
Workshop at RHUL

submission

The scientific programme of the workshop will include presentations of recent results and ongoing research.
The presentations will be selected by the Steering Committee on the basis of submitted abstracts according to originality, significance and general interest. The abstracts must be up to two pages long including references. If a longer version of the contribution is available, it can be made accessible on the web and referenced in the abstract.

The abstracts have to be submitted electronically via the EasyChair system using the following link:
EasyChair Submission.

proceedings

After the workshop, authors will be invited to submit full papers for the refereed proceedings. All submissions will be reviewed; selection will be based on originality, soundness and significance of the presented ideas and results. The proceedings will be published as a volume of Lecture Notes in Computer Science (Springer). The deadline for submissions will be September 3, 2018, with notifications by October 29. Camera-ready versions will be required by November 11.

registration

There are three registration options, depending on your choice of accommodation. The accommodation usually includes breakfast and dinner; the lunches, as well as a banquet on the 3rd of July, are provided by the conference.

  • No accommodation: £300
  • Standard accommodation: £500
  • Premium accommodation: £600

In addition, we have a limited number of reduced-rate places (£350, including standard accommodation) for students or young researchers who would like to attend WADT 2018. These places are limited to early registration before the 8th of June. To apply for a reduced-rate place, please contact the organizers at wadt18 [at] cs.rhul.ac.uk.

The WADT bursaries have been allocated, but you may ask to be considered should any become free.

Registration should take place before the 15th of June 2018.

To register, plese visit the Royal Holloway online store.

In case you have any special dietary requirements, please contact the organizers.

invited speakers

  • Rolf Rolf Hennicker
    Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
    Germany

    Rolf Hennicker has studied Mathematics at LMU Munich. He recieved his Ph.D. degree in Informatics at the University of Passau and later his Habilitation degree at LMU Munich. During that period he worked in close collaboration with Michel Bidoit on observability concepts in algebraic specifications and was several times visiting professor at École Normale Supérieure de Cachan. Since 2001 he is member of the IFIP Working Group 1.3 "Foundations of System Specification". Rolf Hennicker became Professor for Computer Science at LMU Munich in 2004 and Academic Director at LMU in 2008. From 2000 to 2010 he was leader of the Computer Science group of the German research project GLOWA-Danube dealing with environmental simulations. His main research focus is on formal methods in software development with an emphasis on reactive components, algebraic specifications, object-oriented software engineering and, more recently, ensemble-based systems.
  • Artur Artur d'Avila Garcez
    City, University of London
    UK

    Artur Garcez is Professor of Computer Science at City, University of London. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing (2000) from Imperial College London. He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society (FBCS), member of the ACM, AAAI, IEEE, CGCA, and partner at Performance Systems, Rio de Janeiro, and Cognitive Intelligence, London.

    Garcez is Director of the Research Centre for Machine Learning at City, president of the Steering Committee of the Neural-Symbolic Learning and Reasoning Association, London, and founding director of City's MSc in Data Science.
  • Kai Kai-Uwe Kühnberger
    University of Osnabrück
    Germany

    Kai-Uwe Kühnberger, Ph.D. is Professor for Artificial Intelligence at the University of Osnabrück.

    Kai-Uwe is interested in logic, algebraic and coalgebraic methods, theory of neural networks, theory of anti-unification, heuristic-driven theory projection, and information theory. Applications he is interested in are: ontology design, analogical reasoning, neural-symbolic integration, knowledge representation, (non-classical) inferences, natural language semantics, natural language processing, ICALL systems, and philosophical foundations of AI.
  • Fernando Fernando Orejas
    Polytechnic University of Catalonia
    Spain

    Fernando Orejas joined the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) as Associate Professor in 1980. Since 1987 he is Full Professor (Catedrático) at the same University. Previously, he was assistant at the Universidad Complutense in Madrid. He had visiting research positions at the University of Nancy, École Normale Supérieure in Paris and at the Technical Univ. Berlin.

    Fernando's research has been centred on several theoretical aspects of Software Design, including Algebraic Specification, Term Rewriting, Logic Programming, Graph Transformation, and Model Transformation, having published over 150 papers and supervised 12 PhD thesis. In 2015 he received the Spanish National Award in Computer Science "Jose García-Santesmases".

    Fernando is founding member of the European Association on Software Science and Technology and Spanish National representative before its Advisory Committee. He is also founding member of IFIP WG 1.3 (Foundations of System Specification). He is (or has been) member of the Steering Committees of several international conferences having served as member of the program committee, sometimes as the chair or co-chair, of over 100 conferences in his areas of research.

accepted papers

Liang-Ting Chen, Markus Roggenbach and John V. Tucker
Data release and privacy: An algebraic theory for combining and linking data
Marie Farrell, Rosemary Monahan, James Power and Michael Fisher
An Approach to Combining the Institutions for Event-B and Temporal Logic
Martin Glauer and Till Mossakowski
Institutions for database schemas and datasets
Magne Haveraaen and Markus Roggenbach
Theory functors as useful means in algebraic specification
Nour Hossain and Wolfram Kahl
Towards Automatic Aspect Introduction and Analysis Using Temporal Theories in Hets
Bart Jacobs, Fabio Zanasi and Octavio Zapata
Bayesian Factorisation as Adjoint
Wolfram Kahl
Finite Limits and Anti-Unification in Substitution Categories
Wolfram Kahl and Yuhang Zhao
A Flexible Categorial Formalisation of Term Graphs as Directed Hypergraphs
Alexander Knapp and María Victoria Cengarle
Term charters
Jens Kosiol, Lars Fritsche, Nebras Nassar, Andy Schürr and Gabriele Taentzer
Towards Establishing Consistency between Graph Transformation Rules and Atomic Graph Constraints Using Multi-Amalgamation
Carlos Gustavo Lopez Pombo and Agustín Eloy Martinez Suñé
Efficient evaluation of quantitative non-functional Service Level Agreement
Carlos Gustavo Lopez Pombo, Ignacio Vissani and Ezequiel Davidovich Caballero
Automata for partial binding of services
Narciso Marti-Oliet, Isabel Pita, Rubén Rubio and Alberto Verdejo
Parameterized strategies specification in Maude
Till Mossakowski and Mihai Codescu
The Heterogeneous Tool Set - some recent developments and highlights
Till Mossakowski, Razvan Diaconescu and Martin Glauer
A fuzzy institution for neural conceptors
Florian Rabe and Dennis Müller
Structuring Theories with Implicit Morphisms
Ning Yu and Martin Wirsing
Implementing Continuous Time SRML by Integrating IBM WebSphere with Matlab

programme

Monday, 2nd July

10:00–11:00
Kai-Uwe Kühnberger
Invited talk
tea/coffee break
11:30–12:00
Till Mossakowski, Răzvan Diaconescu and Martin Glauer
A fuzzy institution for neural conceptors
12:00–12:30
Martin Glauer and Till Mossakowski
Institutions for database schemas and datasets
lunch break
14:00–14:30
Marie Farrell, Rosemary Monahan, James Power and Michael Fisher
An Approach to Combining the Institutions for Event-B and Temporal Logic
14:30–15:00
Till Mossakowski and Mihai Codescu
The Heterogeneous Tool Set - some recent developments and highlights
15:00–15:30
Nour Hossain and Wolfram Kahl
Towards Automatic Aspect Introduction and Analysis Using Temporal Theories in Hets

Tuesday, 3rd July

10:00–11:00
Artur d'Avila Garcez
Invited talk
tea/coffee break
11:30–12:00
Liang-Ting Chen, Markus Roggenbach and John V. Tucker
Data release and privacy: An algebraic theory for combining and linking data
12:00–12:30
Bart Jacobs, Fabio Zanasi and Octavio Zapata
Bayesian Factorisation as Adjoint
lunch break
14:00–14:30
Carlos Gustavo Lopez Pombo, Ignacio Vissani and Ezequiel Davidovich Caballero
Automata for partial binding of services
14:30–15:00
Carlos Gustavo Lopez Pombo and Agustín Eloy Martinez Suñé
Efficient evaluation of quantitative non-functional Service Level Agreement
15:00–15:30
Ning Yu and Martin Wirsing
Implementing Continuous Time SRML by Integrating IBM WebSphere with Matlab
tea/coffee break
16:00–17:00
Invited speech – Adrian Johnstone

Charles Babbage has been called the ‘great-uncle’ of modern computing, a claim that rests simultaneously on his demonstrable understanding of most of the architectural principles underlying the modern computer, and the almost universal ignorance of Babbage's work before 1970. There has since been an explosion of interest both in Babbage's devices and the impact they might have had in some parallel history, and in Babbage himself as a man of great originality who had essentially no influence at all on subsequent technological development.

In all this, one fundamental question has been largely ignored: how is it that one individual working alone could have synthesised a workable computer design over a short period, designing an object whose complexity of behaviour so far exceeded that of contemporary machines that it would not be matched for over one hundred years?

The key, as is well understood in modern engineering contexts, is to abstract away from the full complexity of a concrete system. The complexity barrier was faced by the electronics industry in the 1970's and 1980's, and triggered a switch from visual descriptions of large scale digital electronic devices to text-based Harware Description Languages similar in style to that of a software programming language.

Babbage too faced an overwhelming complexity barrier, and his response was indeed to design a system of hardware abstractions which he called his Notation. The ideas allowed him to reason in the abstract about chains of cause and effect in his mechanisms, and he believed the Notation to be his crowning achievement.

His ideas were not taken up: one near contemporary rejected it because there could be many concrete machines that had the same notational description, which of course was precisely the point.

In this talk I will draw parallels between early electronic HDL's and Babbage's notation; display some strengths and weaknesses of Babbage's approach; and speculate on underlying cause of the 150 year gap between Babbage's notation and the emergence of HDL based engineering design as a standard technique.

19:00–23:00
Conference Dinner in the Picture Gallery

Wednesday, 4th July

10:00–11:00
Rolf Hennicker
Invited talk
tea/coffee break
11:30–12:00
Magne Haveraaen and Markus Roggenbach
Theory functors as useful means in algebraic specification
12:00–12:30
Florian Rabe and Dennis Müller
Structuring Theories with Implicit Morphisms
lunch break
14:00–14:30
Alexander Knapp and María Victoria Cengarle
Term charters
14:30–15:00
Wolfram Kahl
Finite Limits and Anti-Unification in Substitution Categories
15:00–15:30
Narciso Marti-Oliet, Isabel Pita, Rubén Rubio and Alberto Verdejo
Parameterized strategies specification in Maude
16:00–20:00
Excursion in Windsor Great Park

Thursday, 5th July

10:00–11:00
Invited talk – Fernando Orejas

Graphs are ubiquitous in Computer Science. For this reason, in many areas, it is very important to have the means to express and reason about the properties that a given graph may or may not satisfy. In particular, our work is motivated by model-driven software development and by graph data bases. With this aim, in this seminar I will present a visual logic that allow us to describe graph properties, including properties about paths (for this reason, we have called the logic "navigational") . The logic is equipped with a deductive tableau method that we have proved to be sound and complete. Moreover, we have shown that this logic is an institution.

tea/coffee break
11:30–12:00
Jens Kosiol, Lars Fritsche, Nebras Nassar, Andy Schürr and Gabriele Taentzer
Towards Establishing Consistency between Graph Transformation Rules and Atomic Graph Constraints Using Multi-Amalgamation
12:00–12:30
Wolfram Kahl and Yuhang Zhao
A Flexible Categorial Formalisation of Term Graphs as Directed Hypergraphs
lunch break

venue

Official RHUL information about WADT arrival will be available after the end of the registration period.

location

WADT 2018 will be organized by and held at Royal Holloway University of London in the historic town of Egham, which lies between London and Windsor.

A campus map is available in PDF or your favourite online map.

travel

The Royal Holloway Conference Service provides up-to-date travel information. We summarise this information below.

by train
The nearest train station is Egham which is a 15–20 minute walk from Royal Holloway. Train journeys can be planned via National Rail.
by car
Royal Holloway is located on the A30, 19 miles from central London and about a mile south west of the town of Egham. It is two miles from junction 13 of the M25 (London orbital). After leaving the motorway at junction 13, take the A30 west, signposted to Bagshot and Camberley (this is the Egham bypass). At the first roundabout, take the second exit. At the second roundabout, take the second exit and continue up the A30, Egham Hill. The College is on the left at the top of the hill.

There is plenty of free parking, but please contact the organizers if you would like to enquire about a specific space.
Sat nav postcode is TW20 0EX.
by taxi
We recommend that you book in advance from the following companies.
by air
Train connections to the London airports can be checked/booked through the website of National Rail. From Heathrow, taxi or bus are by far the best options.

The number 8 runs between Heathrow Terminal 5 and Royal Holloway. From all other terminals, Terminal 5 can be reached from the Heathrow Central Station. An up-to-date timetable can be found here. An up-to-date map near RHUL can be found here. The nearest bus stop to Royal Holloway is a few minutes from campus.

accommodation

On-campus accommodation will be guaranteed, as follows, depending on the registration option selected:

Standard accommodation – Founder’s Building
All accommodation has been recently refurbished in line with English Heritage standards. The Founder’s Building bedrooms are all standard rooms with guests sharing bathrooms on each corridor. Linen, towels and toiletries are provided and tea and coffee making facilities are available in shared pantries. Free car parking.
Premium en-suite accommodation – Butler, Tuke, Williamson, Wedderburn and Gower Halls
All premium en-suite bedrooms have double beds and en-suite shower rooms. Each bedroom is situated within a flat of eight rooms and each flat has a communal pantry with tea and coffee making facilities. All bedrooms have secure key card access and there are lifts to all floors. Linen, towels and toiletries are provided. A number of wheelchair accessible bedrooms are available in these halls. Free car parking.

contact

If you have any questions or inquiries about wadt2018 you can contact us

  • via email at wadt18 [at] cs.rhul.ac.uk
  • or at the following address:
    Workshop on Algebraic Development Techniques 2018
    José Luiz Fiadeiro
    Department of Computer Science
    Royal Holloway, University of London
    Egham
    Surrey
    TW20 0EX

Copyright © 2018 wadt2018.